HELLO PREZ APOLLYON馃懡

04.20.2022

Isaiah 62:1

HEB: 爪执讚职拽指謹讛旨 讜执讬砖讈讜旨注指转指謻讛旨 讻职旨诇址驻执旨芝讬讚 讬执讘职注指纸专變

NAS: And her salvation like a torch that is burning.

KJV: and the salvation thereof as a lamp [that] burneth.

INT: her righteousness salvation A torch is burning

For Zion鈥檚 sake I will not keep silent, and for Jerusalem鈥檚 sake I will not keep still, until her righteousness shines like a bright light, her salvation like a blazing torch.

Deuteronomy 16:20

HEB: 爪侄芝讚侄拽 爪侄謻讚侄拽 转执旨专职讚止旨謶祝

NAS: Justice, [and only] justice,

KJV: That which is altogether just

INT: Justice justice shall pursue

Job 8:6

HEB: 讜职譂砖执讈诇址旨謼诐 谞职讜址郑转 爪执讚职拽侄纸讱指變

NAS: Himself for you And restore your righteous estate.

KJV: for thee, and make the habitation of thy righteousness prosperous.

INT: and restore estate your righteous

Job 31:6

HEB: 讬执砖职讈拽职诇值芝谞执讬 讘职诪止讗讝职谞值讬志 爪侄謶讚侄拽 讜职讬值讚址芝注 讗直譂诇謼讜止讛址旨

NAS: Let Him weigh me with accurate scales,

KJV: Let me be weighed in an even balance,

INT: weigh scales accurate know God

And she hath strong rods to make sceptres for them that bear rule, and her stature was exalted among the branches: and she saw her height in the multitude of her branches.

Ezekiel 19:11

And ye shall take you on the first day the boughs of goodly trees, branches of palm trees, and the boughs of thick trees, and willows of the brook; and ye shall rejoice before the LORD your God seven days.

Take to you in the first day the fruit of beautiful orange trees and the hearts of palm trees and myrtle and willow, and rejoice before LORD JEHOVAH your God seven days, all of the house of Israel.

Facts about the Idaho Capitol Building

鈥 In 1905, the Idaho legislature passed the bill authorizing construction of the Capitol Building.

鈥 The architects of the Capitol Building were J.E. Tourtellotte and Charles Hummel.

鈥 The dome and central parts of the Capitol were built first鈥攆rom 1905-1912.

鈥 The wings (House and Senate chambers) were constructed during 1919 and 1920.

鈥 Most of the superstructure is made of sandstone taken from Table Rock (near Boise).

鈥 Convicts from the old Idaho Penitentiary were responsible for transporting the 10-ton sandstone blocks from the quarry.

鈥 Four types of marble were used for the Capitol鈥檚 interior:

鈼 red from Georgia

鈼 gray from Alaska

鈼 green from Vermont

鈼 black from Italy

鈥 From the first floor to the eagle atop the dome, the Idaho Capitol Building rises 208 feet. See a diagram of the capitol dome.

鈥 The floor area of the building when completed was 201,720 square feet.

鈥 Over 50,000 square feet of artistically-carved marble exists in the building.

鈥 The original cost to construct the Capitol was $2.1 million.

鈥 Replacement costs today would be over $100 million with many materials considered irreplaceable.

鈥 Idaho鈥檚 Capitol Building is the only one in the United States heated by geothermal water. The hot water is tapped and pumped from a source 3,000 feet underground.

鈥 The eagle atop the dome stands 5 feet 7 inches and is made of copper. In 2005, as part of the exterior restoration, it received a new gilding of gold leaf.

http://crossbridgediscipleshipschool.weebly.com/uploads/7/8/2/3/78234118/tyranny_of_the_urgent.pdf

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_E._Hummel

Architectural inspirations included St. Peter鈥檚 Basilica in Rome, St Paul’s Cathedral in London and the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

On the first floor of the capitol building, when looking upward to the dome, 13 large stars and 43 smaller stars can be seen. The 13 large stars represent the thirteen original colonies and the 43 smaller stars indicate that Idaho was the forty-third state to enter the union. The floor contains a compass rose; in its center is a sundial that has minerals found in Idaho. The first floor also houses a statue called the Patriot by Kenneth Lonn, for those who worked in the mining industry.

During its construction, the Idaho state capitol鈥檚 architects used a combination of white marble and matching scagliola to create a “Capitol of Light,” so called because the materials would glow in natural light in the rotunda.

The Winged Victory statue is a plaster replica of the original marble statue of Nike of Samothrace. The original statue was found on the island of Samothrace, Greece, in 1863 by a French explorer. The statue has characteristic features of Hellenistic art. The people of France gave the replica to the United States as part of a gift after U.S. forces helped liberate France from Nazi occupation at the end of World War II. After it arrived in February 1949, state officials placed the gift in the Boise capitol.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winged_Victory_of_Samothrace

Attractions in the restored and expanded building include a gilded equestrian statue of George Washington and information about the historic trees that surrounded the capitol building before the grounds were cleared for underground construction. (Presidents Benjamin Harrison, Theodore Roosevelt, and William Taft planted trees on the property; Harrison planted a Water Oak, Roosevelt planted a Sugar Maple in 1903, and Taft planted the Ohio Buckeye in 1911.) The Golden Statue was carved by Charles Osner in 1869 from white pine, the state tree of Idaho. Osner worked by candlelight and took four years to finish the work.

A full-scale replica of the Liberty Bell (uncracked) occupies a site at the base of the stairs outside the Jefferson Street entrance. The bell is one of 53 commissioned in 1950 by the U.S. Treasury Department and presented to each of the states and is accessible to passersby who can ring it.[6][7]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_state_and_territorial_capitols_in_the_United_States

https://scholarlypublishingcollective.org/uip/chr/article-abstract/60/1/8/283546/The-Genius-of-Connecticut-A-Mistaken-History?redirectedFrom=fulltext

Randolph Roger鈥檚 winged bronze beauty Genius of Connecticut once stood at the pinnacle of the state鈥檚 capitol building in Hartford. She was a critical element of Richard M. Upjohn鈥檚 original building design. Her crown of white oak leaves represents the strength and vitality of the state tree; the wreath of dried flowers in her right hand embodies long life, and the wreath in her left hand is mountain laurel, the state flower. Her outstretched wings allowed her to fly high鈥攏early 260 feet above the ground鈥攁s the shield and protector for the state鈥檚 people. Her name, Genius, reflects the intention that she embodied the state鈥檚 spirit of innovation.

Placed atop the capitol鈥檚 dome when that building was completed in 1878, Genius held special meaning to the generation that created the new center of state government. After the bloody, horrifying, nation-altering Civil War, the capitol was to serve as a shrine to the shared sacrifice that preserved the Union and brought freedom to all of the nation鈥檚 citizens.

Genius embodied a philosophy about Connecticut鈥檚 spirit of innovation and ability. Such qualities had long existed, from the founding of the colony and its pioneering experiments in self-government to the crucial role we played in the American Revolution and the spirit of progress and technological know-how that placed Connecticut at the forefront of invention and manufacturing beginning in the 19th century and continuing today.

Florida

In the Rotunda, a copy of the State Seal cast in bronze is mounted on terra verde marble sits. This is not the current seal, but one in use when building was completed. It is surrounded by five smaller seals representing the nations and kingdoms that exerted sovereignty over all or parts of Florida (France, Spain, Great Britain, the Confederate States of America, and the United States).

Georgia

Miss Freedom, originally named Goddess of Liberty, is the statue adorning the dome of the Georgia State Capitol since 1889. Commissioned in 1888, the hollow copper statue is painted white, weighs over 1600 lbs and is over 26 feet tall. She was sculpted with a torch in her right hand and a sword in her left. The torch is a functioning mercury-vapor lamp, casting a blue-green light at night. The torch in her right hand was supposed to be a working light continuously, but it remained dark until it was reconstructed in 1959. Tube and trolley systems have been installed so the bulb can be changed from the inside.

The statue’s origin is vague as the original documents pertaining to the construction of the State Capitol and Miss Freedom were burned. What records remain suggest that the architectural firm in charge of the build, Edbrooke and Burnham, ordered the statue from the W.H. Mullins Manufacturing Company in Salem, Ohio.[3] The statue’s name prior to its christening is unknown, but it has possessed the names Miss Freedom, Liberty, and Goddess of Liberty.[4][1]

The statue wears a Phrygian cap,[5] or pileus, adorned with a star. It wears a robe and holds a torch in her right hand and a sword in her left. The torch is meant to represent truth or enlightenment while the sword symbolizes authoritative armed liberty or enforced justice.[5]

The Phrygian cap (/藞fr瑟d蕭(i藧)蓹n/) or liberty cap is a soft conical cap with the apex bent over, associated in antiquity with several peoples in Eastern Europe and Anatolia, including the Persians, Medes, Scythians, Balkans, Dacia, Thrace and Phrygia, where the name originated.[1] The oldest depiction of the Phygian cap is from Persepolis in Iran.

Although Phrygian caps did not originally function as liberty caps, they came to signify freedom and the pursuit of liberty first in the American Revolution and then in the French Revolution.[2] The original cap of liberty was the Roman pileus, the felt cap of emancipated slaves of ancient Rome, which was an attribute of Libertas, the Roman goddess of liberty. In the 16th century, the Roman iconography of liberty was revived in emblem books and numismatic handbooks where the figure of Libertas is usually depicted with a pileus.[3] The most extensive use of a headgear as a symbol of freedom in the first two centuries after the revival of the Roman iconography was made in the Netherlands, where the cap of liberty was adopted in the form of a contemporary hat.[4] In the 18th century, the traditional liberty cap was widely used in English prints, and from 1789 also in French prints; by the early 1790s, it was regularly used in the Phrygian form.

It is used in the coat of arms of certain republics or of republican state institutions in the place where otherwise a crown would be used (in the heraldry of monarchies). It thus came to be identified as a symbol of republican government. A number of national personifications, in particular France’s Marianne, are commonly depicted wearing the Phrygian cap.

Libertas (Latin for ‘liberty’ or ‘freedom’, pronounced [li藧藞b蓻rt酞a藧s虪]) is the Roman goddess and personification of liberty. She became a politicised figure in the Late Republic, featured on coins supporting the populares faction, and later those of the assassins of Julius Caesar. Nonetheless, she sometimes appears on coins from the imperial period, such as Galba‘s “Freedom of the People” coins during his short reign after the death of Nero.[1] She is usually portrayed with two accoutrements: the rod and the soft pileus, which she holds out, rather than wears.

The Greek equivalent of the goddess Libertas is Eleutheria, the personification of liberty. There are many post-classical depictions of liberty as a person which often retain some of the iconography of the Roman goddess.

. An exception was the winged goddess of Victory, Victoria/Nike, who developed into the visualization of the Christian angel.[7]

Generally, personifications lack much in the way of narrative myths, although classical myth at least gave many of them parents among the major Olympian deities.[8] The iconography of several personifications “maintained a remarkable degree of continuity from late antiquity until the 18th century”.[9] Female personifications tend to outnumber male ones,[10] at least until modern national personifications, many of which are male.

According to Ernst Gombrich, “we tend to take it for granted rather than to ask questions about this extraordinary predominantly feminine population which greets us from the porches of cathedrals, crowds around our public monuments, marks our coins and our banknotes, and turns up in our cartoons and our posters; these females variously attired, of course, came to life on the medieval stage, they greeted the Prince on his entry into a city, they were invoked in innumerable speeches, they quarrelled or embraced in endless epics where they struggled for the soul of the hero or set the action going, and when the medieval versifier went out on one fine spring morning and lay down on a grassy bank, one of these ladies rarely failed to appear to him in his sleep and to explain her own nature to him in any number of lines”.[12]

With the rise of nationalism and new states, many nationalist personifications included a strong element of liberty, perhaps culminating in the Statue of Liberty. The long poem Liberty by the Scottish James Thomson (1734), is a lengthy monologue spoken by the “Goddess of Liberty“, describing her travels through the ancient world, and then English and British history, before the resolution of the Glorious Revolution of 1688 confirms her position there.[62] Thomson also wrote the lyrics for Rule Britannia, and the two personifications were often combined as a personified “British Liberty”,[63] to whom a large monument was erected in the 1750s on his estate at Gibside by a Whig magnate.[64]

https://www.academia.edu/es/38116574/Visions_of_the_Divine_Feminine_in_medieval_Europe

Sean Moon works at Dong Yang Special Metals, which is a Minerals & Mining company with an estimated 1 employees. Sean is currently based in South KRead More

s***@dysm.co.kr

Vern Allen Group Limited | Sean Moon

https://www.vernallen.com 鈥 sean-moon

Contact; Sean Moon. The Magical Moon is Sean Moon – a talented young Magician who specialises in close up magic. He is based in Exeter, Devon but performs all over the South West. Sean has also performed nationally & internationally as well as at the Prestigious Magic Circle.

https://github.com/Sean-Moon/Sean-Moon.github.io

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyung_Jin_Moon

https://www.linkedin.com/in/hyung-moon-252ab9ab

cubits

讘指旨纸讗址诪指旨謹讛 (b膩路鈥檃m路m膩h)

Preposition-b, Article | Noun – feminine singular

Strong’s 520: A mother, a cubit, a door-base

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s